Friday, July 23, 2021

10 Questions With Alana Henry


    

Get to know the other resume writers in our community with our “10 Questions” series!

Today’s profile is Alana Henry of The Writique, LLC.

Alana has been a professional resume writer for more than five years. She is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Nationally Certified Online Profile Expert (NCOPE). She is a member of the National Resume Writers' Association (NRWA), Professional Association of Resume Writers and Career Coaches (PARW/CC), Career Directors International (CDI), and Society of Elite Resume Writers (SERW).

1. Why did you decide to become a professional resume writer?
I became a professional writer for two different reasons: my desire to serve those with unequal access to career advancement resources, and the need for a work-from-home opportunity after the birth of my first child.

I am of the belief that we are all distinctly gifted, and that we should use our gifts to help others in their life journeys. For me, a life of service and a desire to further equity in my community propels me to utilize my talents in a variety of ways. For now, I am using my skills to help others reach success with the development of resumes, cover letters, LinkedIn profiles, and career coaching that helps them obtain their dream jobs.

2. How did you get into the career industry? What did you do before?
I received my bachelor’s degree in journalism from one of the top schools in the nation, but decided against joining the industry post-graduation. Out of college, I spent several years teaching high school English in a school with more than 80% of students on free or reduced lunch. As someone who grew up in the urban core, I knew all too well the importance of mentors and access to career mapping tools for successful life planning. I spent my tenure as a teacher exposing students to various post-secondary options, teaching them about college entrance requirements, providing them with personality assessments and career mapping tools, and assisting them with the construction of their very first resume. I loved it. And I felt fulfilled. Little did I know, I was serving as a career coach to these young people.

Fast forward five years, and I was faced with the need for supplemental income. I decided to utilize my skills in writing and editing to open my own writing service, focusing primarily on resume writing.

I went on to receive my master’s degree in executive leadership, expanded my business, and am proud to now have a team of writers on staff who help change the life trajectories of our clients.

3. What do you typically wear when you’re working?
I work from home with my four little ones, so you can find me in a pair of comfortable leggings and a casual blouse!

4. What is your best habit, and what is your worst?
I am a doer by nature, so I am quick to jump in feet first. On the flip side, that can make me impulsive — and also make it hard for me to learn when to say “no” to a request or an opportunity.

5. What’s your favorite object in your office? Why?
Since I work from my home office, I would say that my favorite object is my door! It allows me to seal off the chaos of four little children and work in peace. :-)

6. What is your “go to” technique or secret when you get stuck when you’re writing a resume? How do you get unstuck?
Something that helps me when I’m feeling “stuck,” is browsing the website of the company for which the client is applying. Usually, there’s a useful nugget of information that gets my brain moving! If I am still having difficulty, I browse LinkedIn for profiles of individuals in similar roles. Sometimes, they have great information in their Headlines, About sections, or Experience sections that jumpstart my writing.

7. What’s the best career advice you ever got?
“Find people, not jobs.” — Melanie L. Denny

8. How do you unplug?
I love to read a good historical fiction novel or non-fiction books/articles on history, sociology, or psychology. I also enjoy time watching a series on Netflix/Hulu and relaxing with my husband.

9. What ONE thing would you change about your business or the career industry, if you could?
I wish that I had spent more time networking within the industry when I began. Many of my early business struggles were figured out over time, but it would have been much more advantageous to learn from a mentor or group of professionals from the start.

I think the career industry is changing for the better, but it initially appeared to be “exclusive,” and as if other resume writing professionals didn’t want to share best practices/industry knowledge with newbies. At the time, I couldn’t afford membership to some of the major organizations, so I was left to my own devices for knowledge and growth.

10. What are your favorite social media accounts to follow?

Follow #blackphotography and #blackphotographers on Instagram

Find The Writique LLC on Facebook: www.facebook.com/thewritique

Connect with Alana on Linkedin here: www.linkedin.com/alanahenry

Find her on Twitter:  @TheWritique

Did you miss our last 10 Questions profile, featuring Angela Jones?

Wednesday, July 21, 2021

LinkedIn Success Strategies: Finding Clients on LinkedIn

If you’re looking to make business connections, LinkedIn is the premier social media platform to use. You’ll find recruiters using LinkedIn to find job candidates; CEOs looking for outplacement services; and other résumé writers looking for writers to build their dream subcontracting team. In the world of business relationships, you just never know who you’ll meet that will possibly send you your most lucrative client, so growing your network steadily and consistently makes good business sense.

 
However, if you think blasting LinkedIn users with connection requests is the way to go, put the brakes on your plans and rethink your strategy. 
 
Here’s some well-researched advice:
  1. Nobody likes a spammer. Logging in to your account and sending out a blast of connection requests is not a good use of your time. And if you think blasting your current connections with your latest service offering, article, or event will make you instant friends, think again. These are typical forms of spamming which will lose you connections instead of gaining them.
  1. Don’t use people just for introductions. When someone accepts your connection, get to know that person and their company before asking for introductions to others in their network. People are very protective of their networks and will pick and choose whom they allow access. If they refer you to their connection, and that introduction or meeting doesn’t go well, then THEIR reputation is at stake. Building relationships goes two ways for this exact reason.
  1. Remember the Golden Rule: Treat others as you want to be treated. Follow simple common sense: If you don’t want to be bombarded with connection requests and offers or solicitations to join teams — and you don’t know the person asking, why would you do those same things to others? Connect with others who have a common interest or whose companies complement yours. A personalized connection request makes a big difference, too.
  1. Allow time to build relationships and to build your network. Your network will NOT grow overnight, especially if you use spam tactics to connect with people. Think of networking as the “planting of seeds,” where you certainly talk about what you do and who you are — but in a natural, organic, and authentic way instead of in sales mode. Over time, your connections will remember what you do — and, if they like your style, they will readily refer people to you; but they need to know you better and that takes time. Remember that it’s about “know, like, and trust.” People want to do business with those they know, like, and trust. This can take time!
  1. Provide value to others. One way to showcase your expertise to your LinkedIn connections is to share consistently. Write articles, participate in groups, ask questions, and share about your mission and why it’s important to you. Educate your followers about what you do or the problems you can solve. Remember, jobseekers are hungry for information — feed them! Done consistently, this type of sharing will keep you in people’s minds and you just never know when they will be ready to hire you or send you a referral. 
 
Networking on LinkedIn really boils down to common sense: Act professionally so you portray your business in the best possible light and be authentic in your interactions. Your ideal clients will be drawn to you once they get to know you as a person instead of as a salesperson.

Thursday, May 13, 2021

10 Questions With Angela Jones

 

Get to know the other resume writers in our community with our “10 Questions” series!

Today’s profile is Angela Jones of Haute Resume & Career Services LLC.

Angela founded Haute Resume & Career Services in 2006 when she set out to leverage her experience and expertise as a certified professional resume writer to help executives and highly skilled professionals land the job they want and the $100K salaries they deserve.

As a former recruiter — and a frequent contributor to best-selling resume and cover letter books, including “Gallery of Best Resumes” — Angela has long been considered an expert in the resume writing industry.

Her credentials include having served as a member of the Professional Association of Resume Writers and Career Coaches (PARW/CC) Certification Committee, where she was tasked with judging and certifying only the most talented resume writers from all corners of the world.

Angela has further distinguished herself as one of only a handful of professional resume writers to have received the coveted TORI Award (Toast of the Resume Industry) from Career Directors International. The TORI awards are a prestigious international competition recognizing those who have demonstrated mastery within the resume writing industry.

1. Why did you decide to become a professional resume writer?
I am entrepreneurial and had always wanted to own my own business. When I was laid off, I was given an unexpected opportunity to take the leap into self-employment. I chose working for myself versus working for others as an employee.

2. How did you get into the career industry? What did you do before?
I started my career in banking, moved to office administration, returned to school, became a network administrator, an application developer, and finally a Human Resource Coordinator. My background — combined with my breadth and depth of experience in a variety of roles — has proven critical when working with jobseekers in various industries.

3. What do you typically wear when you’re working?
I’ve enjoyed a “slipper commute” for more than 15 years now.

4. What is your best habit, and what is your worst?
I am competitive and have worked hard to become one of the top resume writers in the country. On the flip side, I have been known to work through the day without breaks. I would often wake up at 3 a.m. to debug my code while working as an application developer.

5. What’s your favorite object in your office? Why?
I have two beagles who keep me company as I work.


6. What is your “go to” technique or secret when you get stuck when you’re writing a resume? How do you get unstuck?
I walk away from it and come back later. Just like debugging code … the answer will come.

7. What’s the best career advice you ever got?
Honestly…to raise my fees. Clients feel better knowing they are going to get their money’s worth and trust my expertise.

8. How do you unplug?
Prior to COVID-19, we would travel the Caribbean, Central and South America. I’m going a bit stir crazy now with the pandemic.

9. What ONE thing would you change about your business or the career industry, if you could?
I would like everyone to understand the value a great resume writer brings.

I had a client in San Francisco who had been laid off, exhausted all of his resources, was within weeks of losing his home to foreclosure, and his relationship with his wife was in jeopardy. With the help from his new resume, in two — maybe three – weeks, he’d landed a great job. Had he not sought help when he did, he would have been divorced, lost his house, and had nothing left in his bank accounts.

10. What are your favorite social media accounts to follow?

Connect with Angie on Linkedin here: 

Find her company on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ResumeExperts

Or follow her on Twitter at @ResumeExperts

Did you miss our last 10 Questions profile, featuring Georgia Adamson?

Thursday, April 29, 2021

10 Questions with Georgia Adamson

  

Get to know the other resume writers in our community with our “10 Questions” series!

Today’s profile is Georgia Adamson of A Successful Career.

Georgia has been a professional resume writer since 1993. She holds multiple professional certifications, including NCRW, MRW, ACRW, CPRW, NCOPE, CERM, and CJSS. She is a member of the National Resume Writer's Association (NRWA), Professional Association of Resume Writers and Career Coaches (PARW/CC), Career Directors International (CDI), and Career Thought Leaders (CTL).

1. Why did you decide to become a professional resume writer?
I was being asked to help people with their resumes, which I hadn’t done before. After a few of them, I decided I enjoyed creating resumes for people that made them feel more confident about themselves. Since I like to have a good idea of what I’m doing when I start on something new, I began checking into how to do this as professionally as possible.

2. How did you get into the career industry? What did you do before?
Previously I was an executive assistant in a technology company in Silicon Valley, California. I began to feel I wasn’t using all my capabilities in that role and started a business support service on the side. When we had a layoff and I lost my job, I decided to see if I could run my business full-time.

3. What do you typically wear when you’re working?
Neat but casual clothing. I work virtually and don’t see clients in person, but I feel more like working if I’m not TOO relaxed in my attire!

4. What is your best habit, and what is your worst?
I think it’s probably the fact that I’m pretty well organized and like to plan my activities, but I can still work some flexibility into the mix.

My worst? I can lose track of time when I’m talking with a client or a potential client and enjoying our conversation. That means I have to set reminders for myself to make sure I stay on target and can achieve what we need to accomplish.

5. What’s your favorite object in your office? Why?
I think it’s a little ceramic plaque that says, “Remember The Day’s Blessings. Forget The Day’s Troubles.” Either that, or it’s the one that says, “There can’t be a crisis today. My schedule is already full!”

6. What is your “go to” technique or secret when you get stuck when you’re writing a resume? How do you get unstuck?
Aside from praying for inspiration, which I often do, I’d say it’s carving out a “breathing spell” — whether it’s 5 minutes or longer (depending on my timeframe) — where I can step back from the project and focus on something entirely different for a bit. The best case is when I can let the project sit overnight and come back to it the next day. That gives my uncooperative brain a chance to refresh, recharge, and get back to work productively.

7. What’s the best career advice you ever got?
Remember that it’s not all about you. You’re not the one looking for a job. Focus on the client.

8. How do you unplug?
Spend time with my 16-year-old Tibetan spaniel. Listen to classical music. Read a good book (or re-read one of my old favorites).

9. What ONE thing would you change about your business or the career industry, if you could?
In terms of the career industry: I really like to maintain what I call “people connections” in my work, and some of the technology developments (such as ATS and video interviewing) add complications I could do without. However, as the saying goes, “It is what it is,” so I focus on becoming competent in the essential elements so I can continue to produce the best quality work for clients.

Connect with Georgia on Linkedin here: 


Did you miss our last 10 Questions profile, featuring Michelle Dumas

Friday, February 26, 2021

Why I Did a Beta Launch of “Pricing Right” — and What You Can Learn From It for Launching Your Own Course


I’ve been using the Teachable platform for my Resume Writer’s University courses for over a year now. Up until my most recent course, I’d always created the course first, and then launched it.

But one of the strategies recommended by Teachable in their trainings is to do a beta launch of a course, building the course as you go along. Because “Pricing Right” is a multiple-lesson course at a higher price point than my previous courses, I decided to use the beta launch strategy for this course.

A beta launch is often suggested for course creators to help you improve your course and get to know your customers because you’re collaborating with your audience as you’re creating it. If you are thinking about how to do your first — or next course — I wanted to share my experience. 

Here are some advantages of doing a beta launch for your course:
  • To Build Awareness: You can build awareness and buzz around your course launch by announcing the beta launch of your course. This is especially true if you offer the course at a discount to get testers for the course. I offered the “Pricing Right” course to Bronze members of BeAResumeWriter.com at a discount in exchange for their feedback and a testimonial, if they would recommend the course.
  • To Get a Competitive Edge: Getting feedback and interaction with your audience helps shape the content so that customers get more out of it. I had participants fill out a short survey after each lesson. Because I “dripped” the content (releasing new lessons each Tuesday and Friday), I was able to incorporate in suggestions from the surveys as I created the course content. This made the course even more valuable for current and future participants.
  • To Ease Launch Anxiety. Having feedback from beta testers helps you fix any issues that came up when your beta testers were going through your course. With “Pricing Right,” for example, I got feedback from a couple of participants that the information on the slides was useful, and they wanted access to the slide deck. So I went back and included that with each lesson. That made the course more valuable too. And this kind of feedback gives you more confidence in the course itself, helping you feel free to tell people more confidently what transformation it offers them. (Hearing on the survey each week the “biggest takeaway” they got from the lesson was both helpful and inspiring!)
  • To Gather Testimonials. As I mentioned before, the discount for Bronze members was in exchange for their feedback, including a testimonial, if they were comfortable offering one. Several participants offered them up quickly, allowing me to add them to the course sales page before the official course launch.

  • To Help People Who Can’t Afford It. While this was not my main objective, there were a couple of members of my audience who expressed interest in the course — and who are great brand ambassadors. The discount for Bronze members was more than 70% off the final course price, so they were able to take the course at a super-affordable price point.
  • To Get Feedback on This Course — and Future Courses. By getting feedback as I developed the course, I was able to adjust the course curriculum as the feedback came in. The feedback I got from beta testers was invaluable for the development of not just this course, but my next one! I got not only ideas for this course, but for future ones, because people were honest about what they need and want.

I’m grateful to the Bronze members who were part of the beta launch who took the surveys after each lesson. (I gave them a specific deadline for each lesson survey, and did a drawing for a $10 Amazon gift card for each survey, plus a $10 Amazon gift card if they filled out all nine lesson surveys by a specific deadline. About 20% of the beta launchers met the deadline to complete all nine surveys, and I mailed out those gift cards earlier this week.)

I definitely recommend charging beta testers for access to your digital product or course. Those who don’t have any investment in the product aren’t as likely to follow through with the feedback you need. If you charge for your beta launch, you’ll bring in some income while perfecting the product, which is a win-win for the people who agree to participate in the beta launch.

I did have a couple of folks who signed up for the beta launch but then had “life happen” and they weren’t able to follow through with participating in the lessons as they were launched and providing real-time feedback. That’s okay too. They still have access to the course, even though they weren’t able to help me shape the content.

If you’re interested in “Pricing Right,” you can check it out here:

And remember, Bronze members of BeAResumeWriter.com get special pricing (and sometimes, early access!) to courses on Resume Writer’s University. Bronze members, get your special pricing here.


Thursday, February 4, 2021

10 Questions with Michelle Dumas

Get to know the other resume writers in our community with our “10 Questions” series!

Today’s profile is Michelle Dumas of Distinctive Career Services, LLC.

Michelle has been a professional resume writer for 25 years. An active member and volunteer with the National Resume Writers’ Association (NRWA), Michelle has been the recipient of many industry awards and holds multiple resume writing and career coaching certifications, including the NCRW and NCOPE. She has been a speaker at several NRWA conferences, is a former member of the NRWA board of directors including serving as the organization’s president in 2017, and has served in a variety of other volunteer roles, such as on the NCRW Certification Commission, the Public Image Committee, the ROAR Judging Committee, and currently, the President’s Advisory Board.

As the founder of Distinctive Career Services (formerly known as Distinctive Documents), Michelle has a quarter-century of experience in the industry and is known for creating powerful, engaging, distinctively designed resumes that are infused with personality and tell her clients’ unique, branded career stories.

While Michelle still works personally and one-on-one with a very select executive clientele, her focus has shifted to coordinating and collaborating with a team of talented writers to deliver resume wring and job search services through www.distinctiveweb.com.

1. Why did you decide to become a professional resume writer?
In the early 90s, as an adult student with a husband and 3-year-old daughter at home, I decided it was time to get my degree, and so I started college as a psychology student with a plan to go into clinical psychology.

Throughout my four years, professors repeatedly commented on my writing skills and my English professor went as far as suggesting to me that I should be a journalism student rather than a psychology student. This is when I first realized I had a talent for writing.

Before I graduated, I had been hired as a part-time case manager in a group home for adolescents. As soon as I graduated I was hired full time, and it wasn’t long before I realized working as a therapist would not be for me, and I began to look into transitioning into career counseling. When an opportunity came up to run the home’s career development program and teach the residents resume writing and job seeking and job “keeping” skills, I jumped on it and LOVED it.

As fate would have it, this is when what was known as the “WWW” was really ramping up and I was fascinated by it and what I intuitively felt was a huge opportunity. This is also when my daughter was about to start first grade and I wanted to be home for her when she got home from school. One day, I came up with the idea that I would start a business combining my writing skills with my experience teaching resume writing plus my fascination with the opportunities to make money on the Internet. I launched my business, working nights and weekends, and less than six months later, I resigned from my job. That was 25 years ago. :)

2. How did you get into the career industry? What did you do before?
Since I had determined working in a clinical setting as a therapist wasn’t for me, when I first started my business, I thought it would be a good way to start transitioning my psychology degree into career counseling. However, I found that I loved learning about my clients and writing their stories — and I especially loved the challenge of being an entrepreneur in the very, very early wild-west days of the Internet. I immersed myself in my business and never looked back.

3. What do you typically wear when you’re working?
I used to get dressed for “work” every day. That hardly ever happens now. It isn’t uncommon to find I’m still in my PJs at noon. When I finally do get dressed, it is jeans and bare feet for me!

4. What is your best habit, and what is your worst?
My best habit is my discipline and focus on my goals. My worst habit is my discipline and focus on my goals. What I mean by that is that I become so focused on whatever I am working on, and the endless stream of projects behind it, that I find myself working far longer hours than is healthy. I also have “shiny new object” syndrome and can easily find myself going off in 10 different promising directions at once. I have to try to stay very conscious of this and focus on one thing at a time.

5. What’s your favorite object in your office? Why?
Probably the great big bean bag chair where I can sink in, lie back and read. But the truth is, you are more likely to find my dog and two cats curled up together in it than me.



6. What is your “go to” technique or secret when you get stuck when you’re writing a resume? How do you get unstuck?
It always amazes me how many resumes I have written in the shower. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve jumped out of the shower and run to my desk wrapped in a towel, with the words that had previously evaded me finally flowing. I think I do my best writing when I’m not trying so hard to force the words.

7. What’s the best career advice you ever got?
“Clarify what you want for your life and then build your business around the vision.” A business coach shared this with me 15 years ago, at a point when I was burnt out and almost ready to walk away from my business. I did EXACTLY what she advised and every business decision since has been made with my desire to build a remote business … because what I wanted more than anything was to travel. Working part-time while I travel is a small trade-off for the incredible benefit of being able to work from anywhere in the world. I’ve taken full advantage of that ability and have worked while traveling around the Highlands of Scotland, from a canal boat traveling through England, a motorhome traveling Canada, from a cruise ship in the Mediterranean, beaches in Jamaica and Mexico, the rainforest in Costa Rica, and many other places.

8. How do you unplug?
I love, love history and genealogy and have started my own personal genealogy blog to write the stories of my ancestors. But when I need to get away from my computer, I love anything outdoors: especially gardening, camping, kayaking, skiing, ATVing, and snowmobiling.

9. What ONE thing would you change about your business or the career industry, if you could?
I wish the quality of services delivered by those in our profession were more consistent. When a jobseeker is “burned” by poor quality services, it reflects on the entire industry. I believe that the more we work to improve the skills of other resume writers, the more it benefits the industry as a whole. For this reason, I am passionate about organizations that provide training and meaningful certification programs.

Connect with Michelle on Linkedin here: 

Find her company on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DistinctiveDocuments

Did you miss our last 10 Questions profile, featuring Anne Barnwell?

Thursday, January 14, 2021

10 Questions with Anne Barnwell

Get to know the other resume writers in our community with our “10 Questions” series!

Today’s profile is Anne Barnwell of The Write Resumes.

Anne has been a professional resume writer for two years. She is a Nationally Certified Resume Writer with the National Resume Writers’ Association and a Certified Professional Resume Writer through the Professional Association of Resume Writers (PARW/CC). Anne is currently pursuing a certification in federal government resumes. Anne works with clients from C-suite to college students and, as a former stay-at-home mom, has expertise in helping professionals relaunch their careers.

1. Why did you decide to become a professional resume writer?
I was trained in resume writing and critiquing many years ago when I was a college student. (Many, many years ago…) I thoroughly enjoyed working with people and it was something I did well. I don’t know why it took me so long, but it wasn’t until two years ago when I thought that perhaps, this was a missed opportunity. My plan was to start slowly but it’s kept me busy ever since.

2. How did you get into the career industry? What did you do before?
I still work full time in Corporate Communications for a financial services company and work with clients to build their resumes as my side business. Most of my experience is in communications — corporate, executive, nonprofit, social media, public relations, and media relations.

3. What do you typically wear when you’re working?
Whatever I want to wear! When I work with clients I am rarely on camera because I am focused on listening and capturing information. Most often I am wearing workout clothes.

4. What is your best habit, and what is your worst?
Best habit: Taking care of my health. Healthy body, healthy mind.
Worst habit: I am too attached to my phone.

5. What’s your favorite object in your office? Why?
My running medals. For my day job I am usually on camera (and not in workout clothes) and my medal holder is on the wall behind me. It is quite the conversation starter.

It also includes an amazing Marilyn Monroe quote: “Give a girl the right shoes and she can conquer the world.”


6. What is your “go to” technique or secret when you get stuck when you’re writing a resume? How do you get unstuck?
Keep moving forward by putting some language down, and then I highlight it in green. A green highlight indicates that I need to return to that action and fix the language. Yellow highlights indicate a question for my client.

7. What’s the best career advice you ever got?
From my parents, who immigrated to the United States: Work hard and don’t complain. And if work isn’t going well, work even harder.

8. How do you unplug?
Running, knitting, and football. Go Bills!

9. What ONE thing would you change about your business or the career industry, if you could?
Although it gives us more business, I dislike the ATS software. At a time when Diversity & Inclusion is paramount to moving our country forward, I believe that ATS software hinders our ability to address bias within the system.

10. What are your favorite social media accounts to follow?
The Muse – https://www.facebook.com/thedailymuse (Facebook)
Extra Shot of Leadership – https://www.facebook.com/HeyExtraShot/ (Facebook)

Connect with Anne on Linkedin here: 


Did you miss our last 10 Questions profile, featuring Brianna Watts?

Thursday, January 7, 2021

10 Questions with Brianna Watts

Get to know the other resume writers in our community with our “10 Questions” series!

Today’s profile is Brianna Watts of Brianna Watts Consulting and Services LLC.

Brianna is the newest of the resume writers we’ve profiled as part of the “10 Questions” series. She has been a professional resume writer for two years. Her educational and professional background is in higher education administration, and she is a proud member of the Society of Elite Resume Writers.

1. Why did you decide to become a professional resume writer?
I became a professional resume writer on accident. My initial goal was simply to provide knowledge from my own resume writing experience to my peers for them to conduct a successful job search and land the role of their dreams right out of graduate school. After witnessing my own — and their — success through interviews and job offers, I took my offers to my personal Instagram, which gained a lot of attention and turned into a high demand for me to provide resume writing services. That is when I began to take things seriously. I invested in trainings and sought out mentorship to develop my writing skills. After finding a mentor and learning that there was an entire industry and business for resume writers, I took heed and started my own career consulting company.

2. How did you get into the career industry? What did you do before?
Prior to becoming a full-time resume writer and business owner, I worked in higher education and student affairs. My focal points within student affairs were always leadership and professional development. I always had a knack for career services.

3. What do you typically wear when you’re working?
Being that I work from home full-time, I wear comfortable branded loungewear. I have to look like something to make myself feel good enough to work.

4. What is your best habit, and what is your worst?
My best habit is when I am in my zone and focused, I tend to check off everything on my to-do list for the day, and even sometimes start on tomorrow’s to-do list.

My worst habit is when I procrastinate.

5. What’s your favorite object in your office? Why?
My favorite object in the office is my speaker. I love to play my music at the loudest volume sometimes. Music sets my vibe for the day and gives me the motivation and energy I need to power through the day or my task list.

6. What is your “go to” technique or secret when you get stuck when you’re writing a resume? How do you get unstuck?
I will first review former clients’ resumes in the same or similar industry to see what I wrote in their resume. If that doesn’t work, I will turn to my resume writing community and ask my sisters for their help and expertise. If all else fails, I just take a break and revisit it the next day.

7. What’s the best career advice you ever got?
To interview the company and persons who are part of the interview as much as they are interviewing you. A supervisor can make or break your experience, so choose wisely. Ask as many questions as you can and conduct extensive research.

8. How do you unplug?
I take food breaks. I will go for a drive. I will pour a glass of wine. I also like to hang out with family and friends.

9. What ONE thing would you change about your business or the career industry, if you could?
I would hope that one day prospects would fully understand the value of a resume writer and career coach. The work that we do as resume writers and career coaches is worthy of high ticket prices. A lot goes into our skills and development.

10. What are your favorite social media accounts to follow?
Milano Di Rouge – iammilanrouge (Instagram)
Megan Thee Stallion – @theestallion (Instagram)

Connect with Brianna on Linkedin here: 


You can connect with Brianna on Twitter at @briannanwatts

Did you miss our last 10 Questions profile, featuring Laura Slawson?